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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 110-117

Effects of vestibular rehabilitation and pharmacological therapy in patients with vestibular migraine


1 Department of Neurology, Ege University Medical School, Bornova, İzmir, Turkey
2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ege University Medical School, Bornova, İzmir, Turkey
3 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ege University Medical School, Bornova, İzmir, Turkey
4 Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Ege University Medical School, Bornova, İzmir, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Göksel Tanıgör
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ege University Medical School, Bornova, İzmir 35100
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/NSN.NSN_41_20

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Objectives: The objectives of this study were to compare the results of pharmacologic management options and vestibular rehabilitation (VR) programs in the context of dizziness, balance problems, and headache in patients with vestibular migraine. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with migraine with vestibular symptoms were evaluated in three groups in the neurology, physical medicine, and rehabilitation and otorhinolaryngology clinics of a medical school hospital. The groups were defined as routine pharmacologic therapy (PT), VR, or both. Patients were evaluated with static posturography, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), and the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale as primary outcome measures and symptom frequency and severity (headaches and vertigo attacks) as secondary outcome measures. In-group and between-group comparisons were made using relevant statistical methods. Results: DHI scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in all treatment groups. ABC scores increased significantly (P < 0.001) in patients taking PT and those on VR + PT. Posturographic examinations revealed that sway velocity values recorded on foam with eyes closed, which targets vestibular assessment, were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in groups taking VR either alone or with PT. VR benefited patients with migraine in terms of headaches, vertigo attack frequency, intensity, and duration. Conclusion: Patients with predominant vestibular disorders can benefit from VR alone, and patients with combined symptoms (headache and vertigo) can benefit from pharmacologic and rehabilitation therapies.


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